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comrade's face. introducing women into that environment can be really traumatic and humiliating. >> jon: i'm going to jump in here. first of all, i know a lot of german businessmen who would pay good money for that. secondly, you're in a war zone. you're in a war zone and your big worry is dying of embarrassment? and by the way, i think i figured something out here. if men are going to be poohing inches from their female comrade's face, i believe that solves your eros problem. eros is irrational but it's not [bleep] crazy. all right. our own samantha bee explores this more in depth with this report >> reporter: last week defense secretary leon panetta made military history when he lifted the ban on women serving in combat. immediately, objections were raised. >> there is a difference in the physicality of women and men >> it's a terrible idea. you're going to have the sex assault problem >> people are going to die reporter: author and military expert kingsley brown >> women in combat positions are a threat to military cohesion. it's not clear that men can actually bond with women the way t
to be higher? the answer thus far is no. brian is correct a rise in a normalized environment isn't that big. >> have japanese bond rates gone up? >> not meaningfully. in the context t of what's happening they haven't actually done anything. the yen collapsed. interest rates are still low. >> lee munson. sometimes a little easy money isn't a bad thing. here in the united states we have easy money and we have easy profits still going up. i think people are under estimating our story as well, lee. >> i do. larry, i just want you to -- 2013 to be the year you learn to love the fed. i understand why you have perma bowls. the thing we have to remember is what could end this bull market? i don't think it's going to. we have to have the fed start tightening. they are not going to. number two, we have to have an inverted yield curve. there are emerging markets but not in the united states. it's great. so we have to have an over exuberance for markets and we don't. larry, in new mexico i still have to convince people to buy stock as part of a balanced portfolio. so we have japan. it was like this fou
technology, describe the technology right, in the communications environment. and so we not only have to you know figure out how to comply with these and describe that up such that the rule themselves can take into account right, that interaction. those rules that need to protect privacy. >> right. >> bring in the constitution. the statutes, the executive orders, et cetera. >> how do you work -- you obviously work closely with the nsa inspector general. what do each of you do and how do you complement one another in the entire process? >> that's a question i get all the time even on the resourcing issue. why do we have both of you? i think -- we talk all the time. so -- >> which is good. >> which is good. the -- the important thing is i think and inspector general has a degree of independence. right? we -- and that's important. right to have a structural independence, obviously they're within nsa but structurally independent so they can come in and very, very objectively right, evaluate and review and audit a compliance officer and a compliance organization is there really as more of a rules
in the new product is more expensive than other fluids but safer for the environment. checking the stock, how burton down a little bit today. japan airlines grown in the dreamliner will cost the company nearly 7.8 million in revenue. after a battery united flames and smoke. japan airlines said it would seek compensation from boeing for the lost revenue. they have yet to identify the causally battery problems. and the numbers are in for the super bowl. 48.1, better than ever for the nielsen numbers beating last year's giants and patriots. a great game last night. twitter also exploded, 24 million plus about the game. the peak came at halftime when beyoncÉ was performing. dagen: you would think that is the overall, but some people turn their tv sets off during the power outage because it was such a lead, looks like he was stinking. connell: they say the game with the two quick touchdowns right after the power outage and 28-20, so much for this, i will not go to bed, and it went later than we thought because of the power going out. dagen: a little new orleans voodoo working magic against the ra
environment -- we did an extensive analysis to try to make sense why we have had the problem and have had so long. host: if you would like to join the conversation from eastern and central time zones -- mountain and pacific -- and if you are a health professional -- laudan aron, here are the numbers, and we see where the united states ranks in life expectancy compared to other countries. who in the study are the comparison points and how the u.s. to? guest: the panel basically compared the health outcomes in the united states to 16 other high-income democracies. it western europe, canada, australia, japan. basically countries we consider our peers in a number of the means. we ranked dead last in life expectancy among males and the comparison group and next-to- last for females. life expectancy at birth is a cumulative indicator of multiple causes of death. but as we can see, we are not doing very well. host: the disadvantage appears to exist across all ages and demographics. do you have a sense of why? guest: well, one of the real striking findings was how many different domains we are falli
for joining us. what do you think. should it be contraband and illegal or are we saving the environment or being intrusive. >> now, this is one of those times i laugh at the mayor, i never trust a guy, that spends millions of his own dollars to win election he can't win on his own without spending all those millions. he then comes out and says what type of drink you can buy and how big it is going to be. now, he sits there and flat out bored or what, on the list of things they are facing new yorkers, education, taxes, the winter storm, he is sitting they're going, i really don't like styrofoam. i don't know how far this guy is going to go. yeah, it's overbearing. i would tell him, instead of sitting up in your office, go down the street vendors and how complicated this could make their life. i don't think he has done that or any intention to. >> heather: you have the ban on big gulps and now styrofoam, what do you think? >> this is based on the demur. this is based on those who manufacturer and use this in the food business and the fact is, the epa has 57 chemicals that has caused disea
in a barren environment is still a very difficult place to grow tools. radical. it's on the book shelves now. we'll have a little bit more with michelle
. obviously, when it comes to the environment, i think we have like-minded objectives. mr. harper and mr. obama have both set a 7% reduction in emissions. -- 17% we have worked together on reducing emissions in cars and trucks. canada is aggressively moving forward on our plan to ban and phase out dirty coal-fired electricity, and i think we all share the need for a growing economy to create jobs. we share the desire on energy security in north america, and we also share the objective of protecting our environment for future generations, and those will be areas where we will continue to work together. [speaking in french] [speaking in french] merci. >> thank you very much. >> thank you very, very much. we appreciate it. >> appreciate it. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> >> 3 of her four children died, her four sons died, one in the lightest and one shortly after her husband's assassination. the kinds of grief this woman was going for was amazing, mary todd lincoln. everyone thought she was crazy
. the condo market in the major environments is on fire. melissa: really? dottie, do you agree with that? yeah, real estate is back, buy, buy, buy. i heard that before. tell me in a convincing way. >> no, it's back. in fact, new york a year and a half ago, but back across the country, and there's also a shortage of inventory. you have to buy it and buy it quick. melissa: that's a good sales pitch. madison, in l.a., things flying off the lot there, i was going to say "shelf," but there's not the shelf. >> flying off the cove, yes. they are flying, and the market has taken off exciting, this year, so far, we had a big sale of $75 million in malibu with a foreign buyer. it's taking off to a good start. melissa: ridiculous. jeff, let me ask you, when i look at the lot of the markets that are on fire right now, it really concerns me because it looks like all the same problems that we saw last time around, for example, one of the markets you think is going to do the best is phoenix. i know zillow projectses prices in phoenix could be up 8.5% next year. that makes me nervous. >> the reality is that t
. that is a better pro-growth environment. the private sector will drive this growth and that is the key to making it more productive. melissa: you look in the same report, it says by 2023 our deficit is going to be or our debt will be $26 trillion. 26 trillion, 16 trillion. they're both like monopoly numbers that don't really exist in the real world. why should we care about that? >> historically when countries get above 90% of their economy size, 90% of gdp they're in the danger zone where they grow more slowly, they get into financial trouble. we're at 100% right now. $16 trillion economy. $16 trillion in debt. roll the clock 10 years from now, same thing, $26 trillion economy, 26 trillion in debt. what the cbo is saying we can do nothing and live the next 10 years in perpetual potential crisis and with bad growth. that's a very big price to pay. melissa: do you think that's one of the reasons we're seeing slow growth right now? >> i think there is question about it. i think we benefit from being serious about this. quite frankly, melissa, we don't have to have the bad news up front. if we were
, be it at a traditional, a charter, a voucher, a virtual or a homeschool environment. moving forward we want to continue to dramatically improve existing schools and give parents the opportunity to choose legitimate alternatives to failing schools. [applause] in addition it transforming education, we must continue to reform government. take the waste, fraud and abuse commission for example. so far they identified nearly $456 million worth of savings. our reforms allow -- [applause] our reforms allow state government to focus on efficiency so taxpayers get great service without needless spending and waste. our reforms also give schools and local governments flexibility to make management choices, to improve their communities while saving money. for example, our technical schools are saving millions of dollars by making simple, common sense changes to instructor schedules and overtime policies. in race keen -- racine county they're saving money with a program that allows non-violent jail inmates to do maintenance work like mowing grass and shoveling snow. and much of the work being done is finding creativ
and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at the time when the united states was puzzling over the rejury gent as a movement and a political force in afghanistan. as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic member of the afghanistan. and which revived and presented itself as a grave d.a. lem that toment obama administration as it arrived in 2009. our effort to cowhat think tanks do. provide ground for it an complexity and granularity about this phenomena. recognizing that the sort of clicheed image of one eyed -- and his band of the devoted and attractable fan net tack was inadequate and falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not prosecute a particular view of the taliban but just to start to document some sections of the diversity. and some aspect of the characteristic that were otherwise not part of american debate and discourse. i'm really proud of this
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on our reporting from the front lines and tonight, we begin with the department of justice. it's filed a civil lawsuit against the ratings agency standard and poor's saying that s&p misled investors. here's what the suit alleges. it says s&p gave high ratings marks to investments that were tied to subprime mortgages and that made them appear a lot safer than they actually were. many believe securities that ultimately went sour like those helped trigger the financial crisis. s&p says the suit is entirely without factual or legal merit but i want to emphasize, this is the first major case brought by the government against the big ratings agencies and it's only a civil suit. the financial crisis was years ago and as of ton
environment. the physical environment. >> and very important to note that bunker, shep, was only 6 feet by 8 feet. very little room forerer. >> and when he climbed the ladder they busted up in there that's incredible. they bound bombs in there, too? >> yeah, this thing was definitely rigged to blow, shep. one of those bombs was found inside that rent legs pipe that police were using to communicate to jim were lee jimmie lee dykes that entire week. the other one was inside the bunker. the fbi says that dykes tried to fortify the door to keep rescue teams out that clearly did not work. the fbi says both bombs were, quote: disrupted. it's unclear if that means they were disarmed or if they were deston nateed but the bomb squad has cleared that bunker as well as rest of the property belonging to jimmie lee dykes, shep. >> shepard: few people can have much of an idea about the kind of things ethan went through in that bunker, but one woman may, her name is katie beers. back in 1992, a neighbor kidnapped her, kept her in an underground bunker for more than two weeks in bayshore, new york. she was
for in an open environment like this. they're normally trained to urban environments. but it can happen. they can do it. they can get on his trail. and they can apprehend him at night. >> chairman, i'm curious. this is so difficult. because people can have traumatic experiences in their life, bad experiences at work, and they don't turn out like this. and this kind of a horrific situation. but in the manifesto, dorner wrote, "self-preservation is no longer important to me. i do not fear death, as i died long ago on january 2nd, 2009." that was the day he says he was fired from the lapd. now, we have no indication that dorner was on the radar of the fbi. should someone like him have been, or is it just too much to ask? >> you just don't know. if he had these type of supposed while he was a police officer, certainly the lapd was aware of that. we don't know all the circumstances of why he was fired, but i can imagine if you see his actions today, that some of those attitudes, some of those actions may have played in to why he was terminated. so it was probably bigger than the event that was listed
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> let me finish tonight with this. the debate over whether to use deadly force against an american who is on foreign soil and tied to al qaeda. that sounds like a hypothetical straight out of my constitutional law class in my first year of law school. i can just picture us going back and forth over whether killing an american in these circumstances violated the fourth amendment's protection against unlawful seizure or the fifth amendment's due process clause. but this is no academic exercise. this is hardball on a world stage. and the safety of americans is at stake. i read the 16-page undated and unsigned justice department white paper with great interest, especially where it said that "targeting a member of an enemy force who poses an imminent threat of violent attack to the united states is not unlawful, it is a lawful act of
. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." all right, the nomination of chuck hagel as defense secretary is in a heap of trouble. in fact, his uphill battle is looking so steep it might be better if he just bowed out. now let's welcome back our panel. we welcome to the show joel pollack. he's the editor in chief at -- who's been covering this story in some detail. some senators are holding up the confirmation vote until hagel complies with their request for more financial disclosure information. in particular, foreign financial disclosure information. is he going to do it or not? >> i don't think he will. because he has too much at stake in the other institutions he's involved with, particularly the atlantic council. and there are some donors to projects at the atlantic council who have taken some questionable stances. for example, the harari fam
rightous high horse act of why you are a good protector of the environment. your high horse is a stick horse and phonep as a three dollar bill and you an illusion that you are keeping us from cooking in a hot box called planet earth. there are celebrity and environmentalist they don't agree with but i respect them. they are living out what they say. edbeckly and darryl hannah practice a minimalist life style. they ought to be admired because their beliefs match their behavior. goir gore asks us to ride bikes and huddle under blankets and turn off the lights while he crankings up the gulf stream jet is goes at super sonic speed so he could remind us oil is it killing the planet. when he neemeded to dump bleeding tv channel high sold it for 30 pieces of silver. more than that. black texas tea and enough to keep the gore flying for a along time. we should call him instead of al gore. we should call him oil gore. [ applause ] earlier this week a group of republican senators announced a plan to citizenship for more than 11 million im. pennsylvania congressman bar leta said republicans are o
the importance of and making sure the american people were aware of the threat environment. >> they were going on tv then? >> yes, because the news reports had already broken that afternoon. this was a routine engagement with the press, as we normally do when these things are made public. >> the next paragraph says, according to the people on the call, brennan stressed that washington had inside control. >> inside control of the plot, yes. >> based on that, one would know that we had something inside. is that a fair statement? >> from that statement, it is known that the ied at the time was not a threat to the traveling public. >> would you agree with me that disclosure resulted in the outing of an asset that's true not have been outed? >> absolutely not. what i'm saying is that we were explaining to the american public why the ied was not a threat at the time it was in the control of the individual. when we stay inside control, that means we have the operation either environmentally or in any number of ways. it did not reveal any kind of information. i told him through transcripts that i coul
of the local environment. they are unique unto themselves. we need to make sure that we are able to work with the governments and intelligence service is so we can put pressure on them. and number of them have local agendas, and some of them have international agendas. aqap in yemen has a effort underway to bring that government down, and the government has done a great job. there are other elements, narcotics smugglers, human traffickers, they involve kidnappings and ransoms, and are involved in terrorist attacks. we need to take into account what the informant is, who we can work with, how to put pressure on them, but any element associated with al qaeda has as part of its agenda death and destruction. i agree but we need to do is be mindful of this metastasization of the al qaeda cancer. >> in relationship to some kind of centralized control over all these things and having said that the core is decimated, it really varies. we see the al qaeda core exerting control over these elements. there is a lot of independence of effort come autonomous efforts that are underway, and i will be ha
that allow you to exist in that harsh environments. there was a concern that national elites would distort -- destroy the tuareg's. the one thing i discovered, they call themselves the people. their recognition is their whole culture is in their language are. after independence, we see a pattern of forcing the tuareg children to learn southern linkages -- languages and pushing out the tuareg language and culture. fast forward after the rebellion, we move into it a period of temporary peace and stability. algeria had stepped in and there was an agreement, i will not go into the details. we can bring this up in the discussions. we will move forward to the years of 2006-2009, 1 there was a third rebellion. all coming back to grievances that the tuareg were never dealt with. during 2006-2009, there was an interesting dynamic. ) the time when narco trafficking was starting to grow. trafficking started to take solid root inside molly wright around -- mali right around 2005. you also have gs pc entering the northern part of molly. -- mali. moving forward, you see a third rebellion. all these gro
. but it's a little nugget of information, when you are in an environment like this, best to be as cautious as possible. >> do people feel safe there, or they are nervous i imagine? >> reporter: there's a lot of nerves, people are watching this. things died off here for years after 2008, 2009, when the drug war really kicked off here. in 2008 there were over 100,000 u.s. spring breakers here, it dropped down precipitously to the hundreds, maybe thousands of people, this yearbookings were way up. officials are hoping it stays that way. they want to put these people behind bars, they want to try them. they want to make sure people know this will never happen again. >> miguel, thank you. >>> in china, 200 million folks are heading home for a special holiday, what is being called the biggest annual human migration the world has ever seen. . >>> in china millions of migrant workers are boarding buses trains, boats, making their way home to celebrate the lunar new year, for many it's their only chance every year to see their families. matthew chancy caught up with some who are traveling outside o
threat environment. in the near term we've agreed with the department of state to add 35 new marine security guard detach -plts -plts, dee dee tafp -plts that is almost a thousand new marines. in addition to the what is there today we are working to identify where the new detach -plts will be and we will support this initiative. although there was not a marine security guard detachment posted to the benge million mission in a silt based on our review of all incidents that occurred in september 2012 in tunis, in cairo, in car too many and in sanha we have initiated coordination with the department of state to expand the marine's role beyond their primary mission of protecting classified information. as some of you know their primary mission is not providing outside security, their primary mission is to protect classified information. but we believe that we can try to augment their role into terms of providing greater security protection as well. this could include the expanded use of nonlethal weapons, additional training and equipment to support the embassy regional security officer
and that is the environment that we are seeing right now. oil pulling back. as far as the major averages, names like caterpillar, hewlett-packard, as i noted energy, exxon is one of the biggest lakers right now. we did cross 14,000. that was our fundamental moment will the move to those highs. melissa: strongly rejecting proposals for direct talks with the united states on a host of issues including the nuclear program. "talks will not solve any problems". iran was pushing for rollback on western sanctions in exchange for some key concessions on its nuclear program. they say the nuclear fuel is for energy reactors. the u.s. is concerned that they will produce weapons grade material. let's head to the pits of the cme and phil flynn. >> very little reaction down here. the very first place you want to look is the ti spread. it has spread out to the largest level of the year. it is possible that part of that could be this story. a lot of people did not hold out a lot of hope for the stocks. the direct talks with the u.s., they thought maybe something may come out of that. at least they were hopeful. the
: we support add check at gun shows. >>chris: expanded. question, do you think in this environment with this new effort, after newtown you can convince congress not to pact new gun controls? >>guest: the report of the american public sees through this. they want the current laws enforced and they do not want more laws imposed on only what will be the law-abiding and they see this has to do with keeping our kids safe and how much it has to do with a decades-long agenda and drag out the same old gun ban proposals they have been trying for 20 or 30 years and piggy back them on to the tragedy. that is a tragedy. make chicago safe. put federal task governors in this tomorrow morning. >>chris: thank you, and this will be a debate, the first big political debate of the year. thank you, sir. next, chuck hagel stumbles through the senate confirmation. we will ask if the nomination to be the next defense secretary is with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! he
to make a safe environment for all for that. >> the suspect feels like he has a story. this all unfolded nearly a week ago in midland city, alabama, a rural town in the south, not far from the border with florida. the gunman reportedly stormed a school bus. shot and killed the school bus driver, and then took this child from the bus. investigators say the boy has since asked for a red hot wheels car and eez-it crackers, law enforcement delivered those items and medication through a pipe that extends down into the bunker. we're live in midland. any signs of progress? reporter: well, authorities keep telling us they're engaged with the suspect around the clock. today they say most of the communications are occurring during the day. but they say they can't go into details to address the questions and speculation circulating in the community. >> told me a lot of things that were being said, and i told her i said, we're doing everything we humanly possible we can do to resolve this safely, and bring this wild home. -- bring this child home. >> the sheriff says the suspect continues to allow a
, seemed like a normal environment. >> you talk about obviously newtown, aurora, we don't have a template. we don't know whose going to behave this way. >> let me read you something, these are his words, allegedly his own words, a manifesto. i understand you don't know whose at a keyboard when you read something online. i know most of you who personally know me are in disbelief to hear from media reports that i'm suspected of committing such horrendous murders and have taken drastic and shocking actions in the last couple of days. unfortunately, this is a necessary evil that i do not enjoy, but must partake and complete for a substantial change to occur within the lapd and reclaim my name. joey jackson is that a confession, if they take him in alive, will most certainly come out in court and lead to potentially a death penalty conviction? >> absolutely, ashleigh. this is something that he is saying that he has to do. he has to satisfy whatever vendetta he has against action taken against him. so certainly those are admissions, those will freely be used against him in court. the reason of
? because we had inside control of the plot. it means any number of things, in terms of environment allie,-- environmentally, or working with others, or anything else, it did not reveal any classified information. we have to be careful because there are elements of this that remain classified. >> that remains appropriate. it was a couple weeks later that reuters reported that as a news -- result of the news leaks they were told they were forced to end an operation which they hoped could continue for weeks or longer. >> there was a lot of things reported by the press that were accurate or inaccurate. i would not put stock in what you're reading. i know i engaged before that leak and afterwards that we-- to make sure that we would mitigate any damage from any leaks of classified information. >> so you're saying that this reuters report may or may not be accurate but had no link on the -- to what was disclosed to mr. clark and what he said? >> what i'm saying is i'm very comfortable with what i did and what i did at the time to make sure we did with the classified -- that we are able to deal
of political environment that we're living in that they felt they had to release that picture. >> as soon as the word guns enters the picture, rationality goes out the window and i find it hard to see what's going to happen. >> not optimistic. >> i'm not too optimistic, but who knows. >> we have to leave it at that. mort zuckerman, paul krugman, arianna huffington, ed conard, nice to have you on. up next, imagine the country where the speaker of parliament tells the president to stop talking and get out. that's actually what happened this week. it happened in a country of crucial importance to the united states. don't miss it. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 is your old 401k just hanging around? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 consider if rolling it over to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 might let you get more out of it. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like earning a bonus of up to $600 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and 150 commission-free online trades tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus our rollover consultants handle virtually tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all the details tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to help you f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)